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20121224
20121224
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the government's failings in the war in thoroanistan. ...n w well-known face for c-span viewers mary frances berry professor at the university of pennsylvania also of the author of several books. we're at the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about and justice for all. the united states commission on civil rights in the continuing struggle for freedom in america quote. when did this all rights commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it.
the french colony. she was in algeria and came back to france. she had a very white skin. very, very white with speckles? >> freckles. >> freckles. more glamorous. glittering. but she was glamorous for me, sparkles -- no, freckles. sorry, i cannot say. [laughter] but she has beautiful red hair, light afro type but red hair. to me, i was like, oh, my god, she is so beautiful. for me, if i want to be friends with someone that i admire, i have to be like him or her, cannot have the red hair. so i say, i also come from nigeria and i am like you. [laughter] i do not think she believed me so i was inventing names. anyway. so she influenced me. she had white skin. you could see her veins. she was very strange but beautiful for me. i was always attracted by different beauty that i saw everywhere. i remember some movies called guess who's coming to have dinner tonight with sydney party. i remember i said to my parents -- i was 12. if i come with a black girl, what will you say? and they say, if you love her, that is perfect for you. years after when it told them what i could say about t
they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to go to france. churchill wanted to go everywhere. he wanted to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france sunday. his generals were pulling their hair out. eisenhower was. he wanted to be all over the map everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded a
and this daughter i was fascinated with her she was a famous philanthropist in france after row of war one and she legally adopted an entire village from the french government and then north east of france. legal binding document and rebuilt it after the war. the french considered hopeless. she came and took it on and did exist to this day because of her. she was larger than life. she had nicknames for everyone, including the president, she war fabulous hats, and not pretty but very handsome with a commanding presence and worked with the french government. and i wondered as i looked into her life, what would compel this woman in her 50s leading a comfortable life to become so passionately involved to resurrect a devastated village? rewind when eight years old skinnerville was destroyed in the flood and never rebuilt. i began to research the flood as the inroad to the belle skinner story but as i began to learn more about the flood summit william skinner and tell that point* who was on known became alive. he was such a central figure that the papers followed his every move. suddenly i am following
commission. mary frances berry. c-span2. start with compared to the union 22. that was a tough road to hoe but if it is not as much paid attention to because 4 million wear black or slave so when it came time to mobilize the not have access to 10 million but a white population of 6 million, half for women and half for under age. the demographics were tough to start. >>host: how many white males? >>guest: i tried to figure out how many of of voting age. that link was pretty tight and with the voting age white men with 18 through 35 by the end it is 18 to 55. >>host: what advantages besides cotton, we hear about that for years what are the advantages? >> as lee said they were overwhelmed by the industrial north of slave labor south than two-thirds of the capital is with enslaved human beings. they had to ship out across the embargo. and then they could list the things that they don't have. with a lot of faith just says they made the united states when it was they could secede to make this other country in independent to build a nation states on the basis of cotton and slaves. they tal
to go back to france. the canadians paid in hong kong and australian and british in singapore. so after dunkirk here was a country like a boxer is down on one knee and the ref is about to call in a day. host: when did the blitz of london occur? . this is actually part of the battle of britain. the air battle, the hollywood battle of spitfires and everything began in bid july, july 10 officially. host: of 1940. guest: of 1940. that is when the invasion scare began. the germans were soften up for the final blow which churchill never believed was coming. never for a minute did he believe the germans would invade. but he had to pursue the invasion scare tactic in order to build up his armies and get more planes and get equipment from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and church
with the americans over the second front. over when to go to france. churchill wanted to go everywhere. he wanted to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france some day. and his generals were pulling their hair out and eisenhower was. wanted to be all over the map, everywhere. and the fiores -- forays to greece were utter disasters. i would love to follow hovering behind him churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting and it is norway, then when he sells his generals on maybe the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, then he says no, no, we will go to sumatra instead. he gave them fits. host: so, you would tell all kinds of stories in here. you covered the dunkirk story. where was he, what year is dunkirk, what was it and where was he in this process? guest: the evacuation? host: yes. guest: that would be the last week of m
to france? stay tuned for this dvd. and david french accent coming up next. that whopper, but of course. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. lori: how about a quick speed read of the other headlines, five stories, one minute, that is how it goes. u.s. immigration and customs enforcement auditing more countries than ever for illegal immigrants on the payroll. increasing from 250 in 2007, more than 3000 in 2012. projections showing movie attendance will end the year 5.6% after seeing two straight years of declines. not everybody is expected to be a winner with 3d attendance at family films posting a decline. "the hobbit" taking home 36.7 million over the weekend beating out the others. bringing in a total of $434 million in global ticket sales. according to the "wall street journal" some online retailers changed the strategy toward a consumer base on
and renovation site located at terry france soy and the qualified restaurant operators who had who would be able to operate the restaurant and renovate the restaurant and provide the highest return to the port of san francisco and in the rfp we set no monthly represent but instead proposed that the submittals included a proposed monthly rent. we did also annual adjustments we did require a minimum of seven% of all gross sales be included. the construction period in which no rent is paid, may be may have been plopsed the minimum least term would into the exceed 15 years however we were open to respondents proposing option extensions. the again the port's objective was to select the most qualified respondent with the ability of finances design to construct and operate the restaurant on the site we received four proposals the first were both barbecues of s f and s f california tribes attach and walk-in brews san francisco it was determines that the rockship bruce was not -- to the proposal and the summary is in the different areas of scoring. again, the i have included a summary of the scoring th
france in general. so absolute. it has to be like that. things that i did not feel like. i think it's time i was going, i felt really in love with london. i felt more freedom. when i was going there, it gave me -- [unintelligible] sending like, yes, go on to do the things you feel are good. because it is very conservative in paris. >> only you had come to san francisco. >> yes. >> i can only imagine what you would have produced. [applause] >> that is true. >> here is this good little boy who is be heading classically and is very charming and wonderful and working hard. how did you turn into a bad boy? [laughter] and tell us about the whole business of putting sexuality on the map, as it were. when you go into the exhibition here, it is still shocking to see some of the clothes which are suggesting a kind of pervert petit, never against women. you see a lot of flash and tattoos and in the clothing. it must've been completely taboo when you started doing the mine in 1970's and early 1980's. >> i think it was, yes. it was, to be honest, all the things i did that were supposed to be pro
diversity, but also to signal to our european friends, our latino france, we are ready to help lead this state. and helped change the conversation and not only celebrate diversity, but use diversity for our strength. that is our strength. i want to signal to you, let's come together, let's use this opportunity to make sure we can celebrate our strength throughout the state. i also want to welcome carmen chu. thank you for joining us. we can really celebrate and we can bring this state for because i know -- he does not want to be alone in san francisco suggesting change. nobody wants to be alone. all of us can contribute to a more positive outlook on life. guess what -- when we look at where we came from, when we look at the parents that brought us here, the generations before us, we learned a great lesson. we learned lessons they faced, there were struggling to get past the barriers of discrimination. past the barriers of economic privilege, past the barriers of the new immigrants to this country. they forged ahead. some of us aren't new generations, the generation of kids i want to
a dui stop and he got out of the car near sir frances drake and college. they were giving him a field sobriety test -- sobriety test when officers saw him jump the fence and into the creek and officers he eventually lost sight of him. >> we are very concerned for him. the water was swift and we lost sight of him in an area where he could have drowned. >> reporter: at this point, authorities have no idea if he managed to get out of the creek or if he is still in the water somewhere. they know the man's name but they are not releasing his name. stating early the search will pick back up and the chief also told me, if need be, they could bring in a dive team to search for the man under water. alex savage, ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> we are continuing with storm watch, flooding concerns still linger after a creek flooded roads and janine de la vega shows us some of the damage live on the roads. >> reporter: we found out the creek has gone down 10 feet compared to last night. now it was very reaching those sandbags you see over there and we will show you footage of what it looked like
their christmas list. nbc's frances coe has more. >> reporter: as santa finishes up his list and checks it twice before his big trip, most americans are headed out, too, to finish shopping for everyone on their list. >> just getting something for my grand mom, something for my mom. >> mom, dad, brother, sister. >> sneakers for my nephew. that's it. i'm done. >> reporter: but according to a survey last week, there are millions of shoppers who are not quite done. 132 million to be exact. 26 million hadn't even started. >> i know who i need to buy for but not what i'm buying yet. >> reporter: to help in the holiday rush many stores like target, toys"r"us, and macy's stayed open around the clock this weekend and plan to through christmas eve. >> a lot of people have really challenging work schedules, traditional work schedules really no more. and people like the convenience. >> reporter: and although a recent poll show 17% were planning to spend less this year, retail analysts say sales this holiday season are on track to top $586 billion. >> if we recall black friday did about $11.2 billion in sale
's more fun to do it at the end. >> reporter: but happy holiday eve. frances coe, nbc news. >>> undoubtedly this will be a tough christmas for many of those still suffering after hurricane sandy, but some of that pain has been relieved by a group called train of hope. they know what a big difference a helping hand can make. nbc's michelle franzen has more. >> reporter: at the amtrak station in new orleans volunteers from nearby swidell hard hit by katrina are organizing packing up pallets of diapers, shoes, blankets. the second run of donations for hurricane sandy victims. residents and firefighters here paying it forward. >> specifically we were focused on trying to make it better for the kids up there. >> reporter: in addition to basic supplies, this so-called train of hope will be filled with holiday toys all bound for sandy's smallest victims. 30 hours later the train rolls into newark, new jersey's, penn station. 27 pallets in all. half the toys go to the marine's toys for tots program, the rest end up here at engine 155 ladder 78 in staten island. >> looks like our ow
was france was working with a shiite sect, which is a minority, who were to look after the sunnies, who are the majority. 10% or shias of another sect. assad belongs to this sect ands the military is from this sect and the elite are from this sect. correct? >> partial limit he would not be able to rule if it was only them in the inner circle. >> they basically in control. >> they're dominant in the military apparatus but they have also done a very good job, started under his father. of coe opting many sunnies, christians in particular and others, into the apparatus. >> and the sunni elite, of course. they're trying to maintain power. they're a minority group, against this widening majority who is now getting influence from the outside. please set it up, what are the influences from the outside who are taking sides and how is that affecting? it seems like they're at an impasse. the killingings continue and the massacres are increasing. almost 700,000 refugees in three countries that surround them by january or so. at least that's the projection. people are fleeing but there's a lot more
kingdom, france and spain and they are the only ones opening and they all closed early and the others closed completely. they ended with mixed results but slight gains are working through the masses. they closed at 10:00 a.m. pacific time but we are in for a big drop, futures are falling as the worries over the fiscal cliff continues and we will get you closer to the opening bell and we will have a closer indication of where they will start. if you have some shopping to do, you are not alone. 10% of all americans say they will be at the malls today and they are open. they actually like the energy of shopping right up into the last minute. i must say they hate the crowds but they couldn't get out to the stores any sooner. >> okay, good luck to you. >>> it is the last full week for the explore tore yum and -- for exploring and that's because they will move to pier 15. the operation is scheduled for january 22nd and the mission will be free and the new location is schedule to open on january 15thth. >> you have to go. >> yes, i will check it out. >>> 5:19, a new school in the south bay w
they should talk to tiffany france. >> we never took it seriously after she was diagnosed. >> reporter: tiffany got breast cancer at 21. >> her tumors where her cell phone were against her skin. >> reporter: no genetic or other risk factors surgeons removed tiffany's left breast. >> reporter: donna james also got breast cancer at 39. the dots here are where her tumors developed. her doctor said it was unusual distribution exactly matching her cell phone. this image shows tumors were just under the surface of her skin. >> all in this area here which is where i tuck my cell phone. >> reporter: jane said she did that for 10 years. >> i thought cell phones were safe. i was under the impression that they were. >> reporter: breast surgeon lisa bailey tell me cell phone related breast cancer maybe common. but doctors rarely ask about phones. i looked at this random case. would this be in a place where cell phone would have been carried? >> very likely. >> i would never wear a cell phone immediately next to my body. i would advise all women not to do that. >> reporter: nevertheless bras
a backdrop that would convince ambassadors from great britain and france for instance that the federal government was coherent and enormously powerful. so she made the white house into a showplace. and it became that. it was the emblem of the authority of the president. and she knew he had to have that -- >> and typically congress was constantly prosecuting them, or at least -- >> her. >> well, and not without cause. she did sell his annual address to congress to a newspaper to raise money. it wasn't a good thing to do. but -- >> but i loved the scene that you have with her and -- >> and thaddeus -- >> thaddeus stevens, the republican radical congressman from -- >> pennsylvania. >> pennsylvania played by tommy lee jones. here it is. >> mrs. lincoln. >> madame president, if you please. oh, don't convene another subcommittee to investigate me. sir! i'm teasing. smile senator wade. senator wade in lincoln: i believe i am smiling mrs. lincoln. >> as long as your household accounts are in order madam we'll have no need to investigate them. >> you have always taken such a lively even prosecu
. a penthouse in manhattan, homes in palm beach and the south of france, and yachts in both places. >> he was a big figure in the industry. he was the chairman of nasdaq. he was constantly being honored as "man of the year" of this organization and that. and that--that had an effect on me. >> both sons went to work as traders for their father's firm in the late '80s, a time authorities believe madoff's ponzi scheme was well under way. why would your father want to taint his sons by bringing into a situation that could, well, spell disaster? >> you know, that's-- that's a great question. and that's something that i really agonize over as a son. you know, what my father did was so horrible. and it's hard for me to-- hard for me to understand that. >> bernard l. madoff securities employed over 100 people, but it seemed like a family business. his brother peter and several cousins worked there. mark and andrew worked on the 19th floor of new york's lipstick building, where they legitimately traded securities for the firm and for outside clients. the investment advisory business--the ponzi sch
. the professor in france is an antiactivist. he has a book coming out about why we should not have cmos. he has a movie coming out about why. >> he was a pro gm though activist. what does that mean? >> okay. so, let's buy it into the details of the study. they use a strain of rats prone to getting cancer, and then invade use a very small sample so you have a control group of ten rats and another group of maybe ten or 20 which have a lifetime risk of getting cancer of around 50 to 70%. okay? so when you design a study where the rats are going to massively get cancer, and you need to have a study that looks at thousands of rats. that's one thing. the idea also that this is the first long-term study isn't true. there have been other long-term studies which said they are perfectly fine. they also have a long-term studies looking at herbicides that said that was perfectly fine the this was in the first time. >> let's assume this study isn't valid, that there is no scientific study here. they were allowed into this country in the 90's. there is no study by the fda. >> if you look back at the restrict
is now france, was about 18 to 20 years old when his little community was absolutely decimated by a devastating persecution. they say that 50 to 70 people in two small towns were tortured and executed. 50 to 70 people executed in public is a devastating destruction of that beleaguered community. and irenaeus was trying to unify those who were left. what frustrated him is that they didn't all believe the same thing. they didn't all gather under one kind of leadership. and he, like others, was deeply aware of the dangers of fragmentation. >> narrator: irenaeus thundered against those he saw as heretics, including the so- called gnostics. >> ( dramatized ): let those persons who blaspheme the creator, as do all the falsely so-called gnostics, be recognized as agents of satan by all who worship god. >> bishop irenaeus coined the term we call "orthodox." now, literally in greek, "orthodox" means "straight thinking." it's like "orthodontia" means "straight teeth." i mean, "orthodox" means "straight ideas." and those who didn't agree with his ideas, he called "heterodox"-- that means
the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the movers and shakers. they wanted me to predict the next 100 years. i refused. i went ahead and i wrote an article and i picked these people and i was fortunate enough to have met all but two of these people. i think these were the ones that come to me, were the ones that really made aerospace in that first 100 years. if you do not know korlov, he was the van braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courag
and others died when the playplane crashed in the mountains between france and italy. it took decade toz recovery the wreckage. he was identified through dna testing. one oregon mom gets a special early christmas gift from her son. >> merry christmas. >> i can't believe it. >> gretchen: that is sailor jeremy fogul. his mom didn't think he would make it home. sue said the surprise means that because jeremy spent last christmas in afghanistan as well >> clayton: merry christmas to all of the brave men and women around the world. this debate is not going to go down soon. the debate over gun control in this country . this comes on the heels of what happened on friday whenways conference that was critized and he was set to go on meet the press this weekend and everybody was going to see if he would offer up a consession. he's not budging at all. >> if it is crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our scol call me crazy. i tell you what, i think the american people think it is crazy not to do it. it is the one thing that keeps people safe and the n ra will do that. we'll support
. london closed at 12:30 p.m. local time. france at 1:00 p.m. local. germany, italy, switzerland all closed for the day. markets in asia seeing some fairly calm preholiday sessions. here is a look at the hang seng and the nikkei as they performed overnight. or not. there they are at the bottom. all right. meantime former italian prime minister silvio berlusconi is sitting down with cnbc italy over the weekend saying he does not want to run for prime minister but is obligated to. our chief international correspondent joins us with more. we need a lesson on italian politics. what's going on? >> well, silvio berlusconi the former prime minister of italy so colorful with his convictions for fraud, sentenced to time in jail but nobody thinks he will. he is going to marry his 27-year-old girlfriend though he is not fully divorced. he is 72. here is sitting down with cnbc italy. yes, we do have a cnbc italy, quite powerful in italy. and he says, oh, he did not want to run for prime minister again but people have been twisting his arm because when he looked at the data, carl, he is the only one who
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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